SECTION 5       PRESERVATION PROFILES AND PROJECT STAFF

         

5.1. ARKANSAS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS

As the largest research library in the state, the University Libraries has been involved with preservation activities both within the library and from a statewide perspective. In the early 1980s, the University Libraries participated in the National Agricultural Library Cooperative Project for agricultural publications. Materials filmed as part of this endeavor include Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station circulars, special reports, leaflets, bulletins, and annual reports, as well as similar materials from the Arkansas Agricultural Extension Service.

Beginning in 1986, in cooperation with the Arkansas History Commission, the University Libraries served as project site for the Arkansas Newspaper Project. Supported in large part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Newspaper Project helped to preserve (via microfilm) over 1,150 volumes of newspapers and more than 3,000 single or scattered issues. Also, about 3,300 catalog records and 9,600 holdings records were created or updated by the end of the project in 1993. The Arkansas Union List of Newspapers was also created as one of the end products.

Although the University Libraries does not have a separate conservation or preservation department, it does have one staff member and appropriate equipment to microfilm materials on a selective basis. This work is administered through the Special Collections Division, where the filming of newspapers, serials, monographs, and archival materials is handled. The Arkansas Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin is an example of one of the more recent titles that was filmed. The University Libraries also has a separate Binding Department with a staff of three which coordinates work with a private vendor as well as ministering to in-house needs.

In 1998 the University Libraries received funding under Phase II of the USAIN/NEH project. As part of the project pertinent titles and volumes associated with the grant were identified and prioritized for preservation via microfilming.

Arkansas USAIN Project Staff

Michael J. Dabrishus, head of Special Collections at the University of Arkansas Libraries, Fayetteville, will serve as project director. He will be responsible for the day-to-day management of the project, serving as liaison between the University Libraries and the microfilming vendor, supervising the Library Assistant II who will be responsible for pre-filming preparation and post-filming quality control, traveling to project meetings, and responsible for any paperwork associated with the project.

Andrea E. Cantrell is head of the Research Services Department of the Special Collections Division. Ms. Cantrell will oversee the microfilming component of the project, including general oversight of the microfilming contractor. She will also directly supervise the personnel involved in pre- and post-filming activities. Jennifer R. Kolmes is head of the Cataloging Department. She will provide general oversight of personnel from that unit who will be responsible for the techinical services work, including on-line searches and the professional cataloging of the titles that will be filmed.

.

Arkansas Plan of Work and Project Budget

In Phase II of the project the University of Arkansas Libraries, in cooperation with other libraries in the state, developed a comprehensive bibliography of materials important to the study of agriculture and rural life in Arkansas and the South. A peer review panel evaluated and ranked the literature. The major portion of literature documenting agriculture and rural life is located at the University of Arkansas Libraries in Fayetteville, where it is found in the Special Collections Division. For example, Recent Changes in Farm Labor Organization in Three Arkansas Plantation Counties, a 1939 report issued by the University's Department of Rural Economics and Sociology, is located there, as are hundreds of other University-related publications. Such materials have long been a collecting focus. However, Special Collections also has many publications pertaining to the state's history that were printed outside Arkansas, such as Norman Thomas's The Plight of the Share-Cropper, published in 1939 by the League for Industrial Democracy. Such publications oftentimes were found in manuscript collections and subsequently transferred to the Division's Arkansiana library, the richest source of published materials associated with Arkansas.

Other important materials are found at the Arkansas History Commission in Little Rock and at the libraries at the campuses of the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff and the University of Arkansas at Monticello. The titles in the bibliography were ranked according to their priority as research resources for humanities studies. The Libraries will preserve access to the most important 30% of the estimated universe of materials, which consists of approximately 923 volumes and 786 titles.

Project Budget

       

Universe of items captured in the bibliography

923

   

Serial volumes to be preserved

59

   

Monographic volumes to be preserved

218

   

Total number of volumes to be preserved

277

   

Titles to be preserved

236

   
       

Identification and selection completed in previous phase No cost

 

Sponsored cost

Cost sharing

Total cost

 

Per vol. x 277 vols.

Per vol. x 277 vols.

Per vol. x 277 vols.

Pre- and post- filming

$15.16

$4,199

$5.09

$1,410

$20.25

$5,609

Microfilming

29.82

8,260

   

29.82

8,260

Local bibliographic control

& records

   

29.49

8,168

29.49

8,168

Local quality inspection

0.82

226

   

0.82

226

Total direct cost

$45.80

$12,685

$34.58

$9,578

$80.38

$22,263

Indirect cost foregone (35%)

 

16.03

4,440

16.03

4,440

Total cost

   

$50.61

$13,978

$96.41

$26,703

 

 

5.2 IOWA AND IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

The Iowa State University Library has been instrumental in developing capabilities for library and archives preservation in the state of Iowa. It is one of three institutions with full-time professional preservation positions, the other two being the University of Iowa Libraries and the State Historical Society of Iowa. All three preservation programs, which were developed in the 1980s, have conservation treatment facilities for their own resident collections, and they collaborate on state-wide preservation issues through the Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium (ICPC). The University of Iowa Libraries conservation treatment facility also is home to a nationally recognized training program in book binding and conservation.

In 1994, ICPC received an NEH grant for state-wide preservation planning. The resulting plan, published as Fragile Harvest: Preserving Iowa’s Documentary Heritage, established goals for preservation program development and collaborative pursuits by archival and library entities within the state. Preservation education programs have since grown and successful collaborative projects have been accomplished as ICPC continues to serve as an advocate and a mechanism for collaborative preservation efforts within the state.

Over the years, organizations in Iowa have joined in the successful completion of a number of preservation projects. For example, the Iowa Newspaper Project, funded in part by NEH and completed in 1992, was collaboratively carried out by the Iowa Genealogical Society, the Iowa Newspaper Association, the State Library, Iowa State University, the University of Iowa, and the State Historical Society.

The Iowa State University Library preservation program has experienced steady growth since its creation in the 1980s. Just in the last two years positions have been added to support preservation reformatting, conservation treatments, and preservation administration. Such growth has enhanced the capability of the Preservation Department to provide the necessary services of commercial binding, conservation treatments, reformatting, and preservation education to address the preservation needs of library collections of over two million volumes. The Department has established contractual relationships with service vendors for conservation treatment, preservation photocopy replacement, and preservation microfilm.

The Preservation Department includes a 3,000 square foot state-of-the-art conservation treatment laboratory, equipped to meet the ongoing conservation needs of the library’s general and special collections as well as to undertake special treatment projects. The Preservation Reformatting Librarian, in conjunction with the Library Special Collections Department and University Printing Services, is currently coordinating a test and feasibility study of the Xerox DigiPath/DocuTech scanning and printing system for preservation reformatting purposes within the Library. The Preservation Department Head regularly presents lectures and demonstrations for courses and organizations on and off-campus. A recent preservation workshop was broadcast over the state=s fiber optic network, allowing state-wide attendance and interactive communications.

Iowa Project Staff

Over the course of an earlier project, the Iowa State University Library, in cooperation with other libraries in the state, developed a comprehensive bibliography of published materials important to the study of agriculture and rural life in Iowa. The project employed a five-person scholarly review panel to identify the most important of these volumes for preservation in this second part of the Iowa project.

The preservation project will be co-managed by Dilys Morris, Assistant Director for Technical Services, and Ivan Hanthorn, Head of the Preservation Department. The project team also will include the Head of the Science and Technology Department, an agricultural librarian and ISU=s representative to USAIN; the Head of the Original Cataloging Department, a librarian with special expertise in serials cataloging; and the Preservation Reformatting Librarian. The project team will be ably assisted on bibliographic issues by the scholarly panel of historians and scientists who ranked the titles in the bibliography according to their importance to the historical study of Iowa agriculture and rural life.

Mr. Hanthorn will be responsible for the coordination of all preservation activities. He will oversee the microfilming process, including verifying compliance with standards and guidelines. Ms. Morris will oversee the cataloging activities and provide administrative support. Additionally, cataloging and technical staff, the Preservation Reformatting Librarian, and student assistants will assist with project tasks, including, but not limited to, online searching, cataloging books and serials to be microfilmed, completing pre-filming preparation (retrieving and preparing materials for filming and preparing the targets), and checking the microfilm for quality and accuracy.

Iowa Plan of Work and Project Budget

During the course of the project, the Iowa State University Library, in cooperation with other libraries in the state, will preserve and improve access to over 350 titles in more than 1,500 volumes important to the study of agriculture and rural life in Iowa. These volumes were selected by a five-person scholarly panel as the most important 30 percent of 5,000 volumes identified during an earlier phase of this project supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The ISU Library will negotiate a contract with a microfilmer to film the titles identified as the most important for preservation. When filming and quality checking are completed, MARC bibliographic records will be created for each title and entered into OCLC. Upon completion of the filming and cataloging, the master will be sent to the National Agricultural Library and the duplicate master and one circulating copy will be added to the ISU Library collection.

Project Budget

Identification and selection completed in previous phase No cost

Universe of volumes captured in the bibliography 5,141

Serial volumes to be preserved 1,296

Monographic volumes to be preserved 246

Total number of volumes to be preserved 1,542

Number of titles to be preserved 368

 

Sponsored cost

Cost sharing

Total cost

 

Per vol. x 1,542 vols.

Per vol. x 1,542 vols.

Per vol. x 1,542 vols.

Pre- and post- filming

$ 9.01

$13,899

   

$ 9.01

$ 13,899

Microfilming

65.68

101,281

   

65.68

101,281

Local bibliographic

control & records

11.48

17,706

$11.43

$17,627

22.91

35,333

Local quality inspection

1.66

2,566

   

1.66

2,556

Total direct cost

$87.83

$135,442

$11.43

$17,627

$99.26

$153,069

Indirect cost foregone (44.5%)

 

39.09

60,272

39.09

60,272

Total cost

   

$50.52

$77,899

$138.35

$213,341

 

 

5.3. Kansas and Kansas State University

In 1992, The Kansas Library Network Board received an NEH grant for state-wide preservation planning. Saving the Past to Enrich the Future: A Plan for Preserving Information Resources in Kansas was completed in March 1993, and established goals for preservation program development and collaborative pursuits by archival and library entities within the state. Several institutions maintain collections for which standard preservation techniques are used: Kansas State Historical Society Library and Museum, University of Kansas Libraries, Wichita Public Library, and Kansas State University Libraries. Preservation techniques used for these collections include environmental controls (temperature, humidity, and lighting), protective enclosures, microfilming, and archival repairs to damaged materials.

The University of Kansas Libraries employs both a preservation librarian and a conservationist on the staff. They have just completed a renovation of their conservation treatment facilities and offer their services to libraries throughout the state. This renovation includes a preservation laboratory.

The Kansas State Historical Society Library participates in the United States Newspaper Project sponsored by NEH. With over 4,000 Kansas newspapers in the collection, only the Library of Congress exceeds the number of newspaper titles they hold. Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries’ ongoing preservation operation is directed by the Preservation Team, staff whose duties and/or expertise and interests involve various preservation tasks and decisions. The ongoing preservation activities cover a range of options and treatments, including commercial binding, replacement, reformatting, placement in protective enclosures, rebinding, and in-house repairs. The Preservation Team is also responsible for preservation education within the Libraries. After consultation and training with the preservationist and the conservationist at the University of Kansas, the Team evaluates which options and treatments are best performed in-house and which are best contracted with various vendors.

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, Kansas State University Libraries participated in the NAL/land-grant universities microfilming project. This project filmed older Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service serials. Kansas filmed the Annual Report, Biennial Report of the Director, Bulletin, Circular, and several other series of the Agricultural Experiment Station from 1888 through the early 1960s, as well as the Extension Bulletin (1915-1962) and Circular (1913-1979) from the Cooperative Extension Service.

From 1994 through 1997, KSU Libraries with KSU College of Agriculture’s Department of Communication participated in a USDA Cooperative Agreement to preserve current publications produced by the Agriculture Experiment Stations and Cooperative Extension Service as well as some 900 pre-1945 documents. The purpose of the Cooperative Agreement was to digitize these documents, making them available in real time via the KSU College of Agriculture web server, and to produce CD products. This project also involved creation of bibliographic records for each title. The bibliographic records were created jointly by the Department of Communications and KSU Libraries staffs. These records, in MARC format, were entered in KSU Libraries’ local system, submitted to NAL, and entered on a Kansas Extension Offices database.

KSU Libraries completed a condition survey of items in the general stacks prior to the renovation of the facilities. The Special Collections Department has just completed and implemented a five-year preservation plan for their collections.

Kansas USAIN Project Staff

Kansas’ project will be managed by Diana Farmer, Sciences Collection Manager. Prior to 1990, Ms. Farmer’s library experience was in technical services. Since 1990, she has provided reference and collection management service to agriculture faculty and students as well as other science users.

Ms. Farmer will be assisted throughout the project by Roger Adams, Rare Books Librarian in the Richard L.D. & Marjorie J. Morse Department of Special Collections. He was Curator of Special Collections & Archives at Northern Kentucky University (1994-1998) and has served as a preservation/conservation consultant for the Behringer-Crawford Museum (Covington, Kentucky), the Dinsmore Homestead Foundation (Burlington, Kentucky), and the Cincinnati Fire Museum.

During the bibliography phase, the project staff will include Mike Haddock, Agricultural Librarian, and Margaret Parks, Economics and Agricultural Economics Librarian. Mr. Haddock’s career specialization at both Texas A & M and KSU is agricultural reference and collections. He has been active both locally and nationally. At the national level, he served on the Oberly Award Committee from 1989-1995, and was its chair from 1994-1995. He has also been active in ACRL’s Science and Technology Section. Ms. Parks has recently begun her career as a social science specialist, with responsibilities for agricultural economics. During the microfilming phase, staff will include various individuals from the Technical Services Department, primarily from the Cataloging and Binding Units.

The project staff will be ably assisted by a scholarly review panel of historians and scientists with extensive experience in the study of Kansas agriculture and rural life.

Kansas Scholarly Review Panel

Dr. Homer Socolofsky has been a member of the history faculty at Kansas State University since 1947. He is now Professor Emeritus and University Historian. His master’s thesis at Kansas State University, 1947, and his doctoral dissertation at the University of Missouri, Columbia, 1954, were in the area of agricultural history; both became the basis for books. He has been president of the Agricultural History Society and the Kansas State Historical Society. His ten books include others in agricultural history, which is his teaching and research field; in the history of Kansas; and in the history of the American West. His many articles, encyclopedia entries and book reviews are concentrated in these areas. Dr. Socolofsky’s grants include an Internship in General Education at Yale University, and as a Fulbright lecturer at Punjab University, Chandigahr, India.

Dr. Donald Erickson retired as Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University after spending 32 years developing educational programs for the agricultural and agribusiness sectors in Kansas. He has authored 10 refereed articles, 36 experiment station bulletins, 43 extension publications, and 7 staff papers. He has testified four times at Federal congressional hearings. Dr. Erickson received a B.S. in Animal Science and an M.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Wyoming, and a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Purdue University in 1963. He was on the agricultural economics teaching and research faculty at South Dakota State University until 1969, when he was appointed to an agricultural economics extension-research position at Kansas State University. He served as a state specialist in agricultural and rural community economic development for most of his tenure at Kansas State, and also served as extension state leader in agricultural economics and in a teaching-research appointment. Dr. Erickson also has extensive international experience, completing assignments on four continents working with different aspects of agricultural and rural development programs.

Dr. Leroy Page is Professor Emeritus in the Department of History. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma in 1963. His area of specialization is the History of Science and Technology. He has published 6 refereed articles and is currently researching the history of the Kansas Academy of Science.

As the fourth reviewer was suddenly forced to withdraw for family medical reasons, another reviewer will be named later from the College of Agriculture faculty.

Kansas Plan of Work and Project Budget

During the course of the project, KSU Libraries, in cooperation with other libraries in the state, will develop a comprehensive bibliography of published materials important to the study of agriculture and rural life in Kansas. The first six to nine months will involve a bibliographic compilation and evaluation. The project will employ a four-person scholarly review panel to rank titles according to their priority as research resources for humanistic studies, and will target to be preserved the most important 30% of a universe of approximately 5,000 volumes. The second portion will be filming, commencing at the beginning of the second year of work. KSU Libraries will negotiate a contract with a microfilmer to film the titles identified as the most important for preservation. Actual filming will begin once the ranked listing is completed. When filming and quality checking are completed, MARC bibliographic records will be created for each title and entered into OCLC. Upon completion of the filming and cataloging, the master will be sent to the National Agricultural Library and the duplicate master and one circulating copy will be added to KSU Libraries’ collections.

Project Budget

Estimated universe of relevant volumes 5,000

Serial volumes to be preserved 640

Monographic volumes to be preserved 860

Total number of volumes to be preserved 1,500

Estimated number of titles to be preserved 775

 

Sponsored cost

Cost sharing

Total cost

Identification & selection

   

Salaries & fringe benefits

$22,163

$8,861

$31,024

Search costs (3000 titles @ $1.80)

5,400

5,400

Honoraria (4 @ $450)

1,800

 

1,800

Travel

2,285

1,500

3,785

Total direct identification cost $26,248

$15,761

$42,009

       
       

Filming

Per vol. x 1,500 vols.

Per vol. x 1,500 vols.

Per vol. x 1,500 vols.

Pre- and post- filming

$ 8.04

$12,055

$15.81

$23,709

$23.84

35,764

Microfilming

71.88

107,820

   

71.88

107,820

Local bibliographic

control & records

18.40

27,595

2.53

3,800

20.93

31,395

Local quality inspection

4.82

7,235

3.83

5,742

8.65

12,977

Total direct filming cost

103.14

$154,705

$22.17

$33,251

$125.30

$187,956

             

Total direct cost

 

$180,953

 

$49,012

 

$229,965

Indirect cost foregone (34%)

   

61,524

 

61,524

Total cost

     

$110,536

 

$291,489

 

 

5.4 MICHIGAN AND MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Michigan State University, as a premier land-grant institution, is well positioned to undertake the identification and preservation of state and local literature on Michigan agriculture and rural life in conjunction with the national USAIN project. The strength of the agricultural collections, in addition to strong cooperative ties with the Library of Michigan and other state higher education institutions, provides a strong basis for developing the bibliography. Preservation of these titles correlates well with the overall preservation mission of the MSU Libraries. The Preservation Department of the Michigan State University Libraries was established in 1991, drawing together the already established units of book repair, collection renewal, and bindery preparation with a disaster prevention committee. In 1997 the Access and Preservation Division was created as part of a library-wide reorganization. The division includes the Preservation Office, Book Repair, Binding Preparation, Circulation, Stacks Maintenance, and Special Collections. In the 1997/98 ARL Preservation Statistics, MSU Libraries reported thirteen FTE staff engaged in preservation activities with expenditures of $582,433.

The Libraries’ first microfilming effort was a two-year project begun in 1982 as part of a cooperative program with the National Agricultural Library to preserve all publications from the state of Michigan which were issued by the Agricultural Experiment Station, Cooperative Extension Service, and other campus organizations. Subsequently, Michigan State University Libraries have participated in four CIC cooperative microfilming projects to preserve a large collection of African studies materials that had become brittle and would have otherwise been lost. Each of the four grant projects was completed on time and, in at least one case, the goal set for volumes to be microfilmed was exceeded by more than 200 volumes. Since the first project began in 1988, a total of 4425 volumes have been microfilmed and more than 400 additional volumes conserved. Other reformatting options currently in use include preservation photocopy and digitization. Most recently the Libraries have been awarded two preservation grants to provide digital access to portions of the Vincent Voice Library and a collection of historic Sunday school primers.

Michigan USAIN Project Staff

Michigan’s project will be managed by Jeanne Drewes, Assistant Director for Access and Preservation. Ms. Drewes has managed both microfilming and digital preservation projects and has published in the area of preservation. The project team will include Anita Ezzo, Food Science and Technology Librarian, and Amy Blair, Head of Outreach Services and Agriculture Bibliographer. Ms. Ezzo is a member of the USAIN Executive Council and the book review editor for the Journal of Agricultural & Food Information. She will take the lead in developing and refining the scope of the bibliography, compiling the citations, and coordinating the work of the scholarly reviewers.

Amy Blair has served as the Agriculture Librarian since 1991 and participated in Cornell University’s project to identify the Core Literature of the Agricultural Sciences. She is well-versed in the literature supporting agriculture in Michigan and in the United States. Support staff will assist in the verification and location of titles and the compilation of selected citations. The project team will also be assisted by a scholarly panel of historians and scientists.

Michigan Scholarly Review Panel

Kenneth E. Lewis, Jr. received both his B.A. and his M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Florida in the late 60s. His Ph.D. was awarded in 1975 from the University of Oklahoma. After working in Oklahoma and South Carolina teaching and making archaeological investigations relating to those areas, he joined the Michigan State University Department of Anthropology in 1984. Since that time he has amassed documentary data for a study of settlement patterning in Michigan during the first half of the nineteenth century. Dr. Lewis has a large body of publications on settlement patterns covering diverse areas. His most recent works accepted for publication include "Farmsteads and Landscapes in Antebellum Michigan" (in Retrieving Michigan’s Buried Past), Frontier Studies: An Approach to Michigan’s Past, and "Imagination and Archaeological Interpretation: A Methodological Tale" (in Historical Archaeology). Lewis served on the Michigan Bureau of History, State Historic Preservation Review Board, from 1985-91, and is an active member of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

Terry Shaffer is Assistant Curator and Extension Specialist with the Agricultural Heritage Program of Michigan State University Museum and MSU Extension. He is also a core faculty member of the Bailey Scholars Program in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In these roles he has developed a variety of exhibits and programs concerning Michigan's agricultural heritage. He was one of the key people responsible for the creation of a highly successful series on barn rehabilitation, funded by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Michigan Humanities Council. The presentation on the history of Michigan barns and agriculture developed for the workshop continues to be offered through the Chautauqua Program of the Michigan Humanities Council. Dr. Shaffer has curated exhibits and developed programs on a variety of agricultural topics including historic apple varieties, agricultural tourism, Centennial farms, the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, plank frame barns, the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and heritage livestock. He is currently serving as Project Scholar for the Michigan Humanities Council venue of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling exhibit, "Barn Again: Celebrating an American Icon." He has conducted sessions and initiated collaborative efforts concerning Michigan's agricultural heritage with the Michigan Museums Association, the Association for Living History Farms and Agricultural Museums, the Michigan Oral History Association, the Michigan Centennial Farm Association, the State Historic Preservation Office, the Michigan Department of Education, the Michigan State Fair, and numerous local museums and historical groups.

Thomas Summerhill received his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego, in 1993. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship in the Program in Agrarian Studies of Yale University’s Institute for Social and Policy Studies in 1997, he joined the Michigan State University Department of History. He has taught seminars relating to America’s rural past and will be team-teaching two courses in Michigan agricultural history in the near future. Dr. Summerhill has presented several conference papers and written numerous reviews of monographs relating to agricultural and rural history. He is currently preparing a manuscript entitled Harvest of Dissent: Agrarian Movements and the Emergence of Capitalism in Nineteenth Century New York. He has served as a consultant for the New York State Historical Association’s Farmer’s Museum and for the Erie Canal Museum in Syracuse, New York. He is a member of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, and the Agricultural History Society.

David E. Wright received his A.B. from Princeton University and his Ph.D. in American Studies from Michigan State University. His research focuses on the history of agriculture, particularly the development of agricultural science and technology since 1880. He is currently completing a study of the Farm Chemurgic Movement, a coalition of scientists, agriculturists, and industrialists who, between the World Wars, laid the foundation for what is now called biotechnology. He has served as the Program Officer, Humanities Science and Technology, at the National Endowment for the Humanities. Dr. Wright currently teaches in the Department of Resource Development, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, at Michigan State University. He also serves the University as Assistant Vice President for Research and as the University Intellectual Integrity Officer.

Michigan Plan of Work and Project Budget

Over the course of the project, Michigan State University Library, in cooperation with other libraries in the state, will develop a comprehensive bibliography of published materials important to the study of agriculture and rural life in Michigan. This will include coordination with the University of Michigan concerning its forestry and natural resources collections. The project will employ a four-person scholarly review panel to rank titles according to their priority as research resources for humanities studies. The most important 25% of the estimated universe of 1,800-2,200 volumes will be targeted for preservation in a subsequent project.

Project Budget

Sponsor

costs

Cost

Share

Total

Salaries and Fringe Benefits

$16,045

$1,079

$17,124

Search costs (12,000 @ $.59 per search)

7,080

7,080

Honoraria (4 @ $450 per person)

1,800

1,800

Travel

2,000

2,000

Total Direct Costs

$26,925

$1,079

$28,004

Indirect Cost Foregone @ 38%

10,232

10,232

Total

$11,311

$38,236

 

 

5.5. MINNESOTA AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

The University of Minnesota Libraries has participated and continues to participate in several consortial microfilming projects under the aegis of the Research Libraries Group (RLG) and the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). Through 1997/98, the Libraries microfilmed 6,100 volumes of 19th century European cultural history journals in CIC cooperative projects. The Libraries filmed 10,900 volumes in RLG cooperative microfilming projects—all from the Hess Collection of Dime Novels. The Libraries is currently in the midst of a two-year CIC project to film 739 volumes of 19th century European government documents and 18th and 19th century travel writings about the Indian subcontinent. The University of Minnesota Libraries participated in the NAL/land-grant universities microfilming project in the early 1980s. This project filmed older Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural Extension Service, and some academic department publications, including both monographs and serials.

The University Libraries' ongoing preservation operation provides for integrated preservation selection from a range of options and treatments, including replacement, reformatting, phased conservation through placement in protective storage or protective enclosures, rebinding, and in-house conservation. The operation is supported by regular annual budgets. Criteria and procedures for selection have been refined over the years with regular input from bibliographers, whose role in selecting what will be preserved and appropriate treatments for the materials have been systematized. The University Libraries follows preservation standards to reproduce, on a need basis, materials that are seriously deteriorated and/or heavily used by microfilming/preservation photocopying. The Libraries completed a formal preservation needs analysis during 1997/98 (with Carla Montori, University of Michigan Preservation Librarian, serving as consultant), which assessed collection condition, identified preservation needs, and assigned priorities.

The University is currently completing a two-year project (funded by NEH and coordinated by Cornell) to develop a bibliography of Minnesota agricultural literature and to establish priorities for preservation.

Minnesota USAIN Project Staff

Minnesota’s participation in this phase of the project will be managed by JoAnn DeVries, Collections Coordinator for the Agriculture, Biology, and Environment Resources Group and Bibliographer/Reference Librarian. During the first phase, Ms. DeVries was responsible for bibliographic analysis and selection including developing and refining the scope of the bibliography, compiling citations, and coordinating the work of the scholarly reviewers. She is being assisted by staff of the Magrath Library and of St. Paul Campus branch libraries (Forestry; Plant Pathology; Horticulture; and Entomology, Fisheries and Wildlife), and a scholarly panel of historians and scientists with extensive experience in the study of Minnesota agriculture and rural life. In the next phase, Ms. DeVries will be responsible for preservation activities -- managing the microfilming and ensuring compliance with all preservation and access standards and guidelines for the project. Marlys McGuire, Documents and Reference Librarian, is currently deputy project manager and will continue in that role. Cataloging responsibilities will be overseen by Marilyn McClaskey, head of the Magrath Library Cataloging Unit. Preservation functions (including preparation of deteriorated materials for preservation microfilming) within the project will be directed by Karl Isely, who manages preservation/conservation activities for the University Libraries. For each function, appropriate support staff and student assistants will be assigned.

Minnesota Plan of Work and Project Budget

The University Libraries will use the University of Michigan Preservation Department for microfilm production. This service is being used for Minnesota’s current CIC/NEH-funded project. The Libraries secured cost estimates from two commercial services and has found the University of Michigan services to be competitive. In addition, Michigan offers the high quality needed for the project and has extensive experience in preservation microfilming for archival and printed library materials, produces all film in compliance with ANSI/AIIM specifications and RLG guidelines, and has completed numerous NEH-funded projects.

Project Budget

Identification and selection completed in previous phase          No cost

Universe of volumes captured in the bibliography 9,000

Number of monograph volumes to be preserved 240

Number of serial volumes to be preserved 2,750

Total number of volumes to be preserved: 2,990

Number of titles to be preserved: 350

 

Sponsored cost

Cost sharing

Total cost

 

Per vol. x 2,990 vols.

Per vol. x 2,990 vols.

Per vol. x 2,990 vols.

Pre- and post- filming

$9.01

$26,954

$0.54

$1,607

$9.55

$28,561

Microfilming

67.33

201,332

   

67.33

201,332

Local bibliographic

control & records

10.17

30,419

5.25

15,708

15.43

46,127

Local quality inspection

1.82

5,438

   

1.82

5,438

Total direct cost

$88.34

$264,143

$5.79

$17,315

$94.13

$281,458

Indirect cost foregone (35%)

 

30.92

92,450

30.92

92,450

Total cost

   

$36.71

$109,765

$125.05

$373,908

 

 

5.6 New Mexico and New Mexico State University

There are several preservation programs in the state of New Mexico. The New Mexico Historical Records Advisory Board advocates for preservation and access to the state’s historical records. The New Mexico Preservation Alliance includes many of the state’s libraries in a concerted effort to provide training and expertise. The New Mexico State University Library has been involved in several preservation projects. A conservation laboratory is contained within the Library’s Rio Grande Historical Collection and is equipped with archival quality microfilming apparatus. Here materials are cleaned, treated for contaminants, and buffered against acid deterioration. The library has recently hired a librarian with preservation responsibilities. She is active with the NM Preservation Alliance, and the Special Collections Librarian is the co-chair of the Alliance. The NMSU Library was a participant in a statewide newspaper preservation alliance and also participated in the microfilming project led by the National Agricultural Library to preserve state extension and experiment station documents in the 1980s. Preservation efforts at the University of New Mexico are also ongoing.

New Mexico USAIN Project Staff

Tim McKimmie, Agriculture Librarian at NMSU, will serve as project manager. He has served in his present position since 1990 and is responsible for library services to the College of Agriculture and Home Economics. He has Masters degrees in both library science and agriculture and has published in both areas. He will be responsible for the overall success of the project and will coordinate with other libraries in the state. Mr. McKimmie will be assisted by Karen George, NMSU Library Specialist. Ms. George has served as government documents specialist at NMSU Library for 23 years. Mr. McKimmie and Ms. George will be primarily responsible for identifying the universe of materials to be considered for preservation. They will be assisted by another person to be hired to create the database of bibliographic records.

Other members of the project committee will be Marah deMeule, Austin Hoover, and Jean Dickinson. Ms. DeMeule and Mr. Hoover represent the Archives Department of the library. Mr. Hoover has had extensive experience working with microfilming projects as well as historical documents. Ms. DeMeule has experience with the Library of Congress’ manuscripts processing section and presently provides reference service and processing and cataloging of archival and manuscript materials at the NMSU Library. Mr. Hoover and Ms. DeMeule will coordinate this aspect of the preservation effort. A student will be hired to do the local inspection with strong supervisory assistance. Ms. Dickinson, assistant collection management librarian, will assist with quality control and moving the materials through the cataloging unit. Her previous library experience includes management of collections and acquisitions procedures. The project staff will be assisted by a panel of four scholarly reviewers of the bibliography; the reviewers have extensive experience in the study of New Mexico agriculture and rural life.

New Mexico Scholarly Review Panel

Robert Lee Hart is Curator of Interpretation, New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, Las Cruces, New Mexico. He holds an M.A. in American History from New Mexico State University. He was formerly Director of the Lincoln County Heritage Trust, Lincoln, NM, and served as Public Interpreter for the National Park Service at several locations. He also holds a post as Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of History, NMSU. He is currently Editor of Southern New Mexico Historical Review (Dona Ana County Historical Society)

Louis R. Sadler is Professor and Department Head, History Department, New Mexico State University. His Ph.D. is in Latin American History from the University of South Carolina. His research interests include U.S.-Mexico border history and preservation of the culture and traditions of the Mesilla Valley, New Mexico. Among his related activities, he has been Chair of the New Mexico Border Commission; Director of the Center for Latin American Studies, NMSU; and Director of the Joint Border Research Institute.

Lois Stanford is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology, New Mexico State University. Her research interests include the history and sociology of agriculture in Mexico and the southwest United States. Examples of the topics of her many publications and papers include: peasant organizations in Michoacán; economic reforms and agricultural organizations in Chile; anthropological perspectives on agricultural organizations in New Mexico; new forms of association and alliance in Mexican agribusiness; "privatization" of Mexican agriculture: the impact on peasant organizations; and social constraints to sustainable agriculture.

Kelly W. Allred is Professor in the Department of Range Science, New Mexico State University. His primary field of interest is plant taxonomy and grasses of the Southwest. In addition, Dr. Allred is interested in the history of New Mexico botanists and agriculturists. His published books include A Field Guide to the Grasses of New Mexico and A Working Index of New Mexico Vascular Plant Names. His articles about the history of botany in New Mexico include "The Trail of E.O. Wooton", New Mexico Resources 9:3-18, Spring 1993; and "Elmer Ottis Wooton and the Botanizing of New Mexico," Systematic Botany 15(4):700-719, 1990.

New Mexico Plan of Work and Project Budget

Over the course of the project the New Mexico State University Library, in cooperation with other libraries in the state, will develop a comprehensive bibliography of published materials important to the study of agriculture and rural life in the state and the southwest. The primary source for agricultural history and rural life materials which will be of value in addition to NSMU is that of the New Mexico State Library. Some smaller libraries with strong historical collections will have to be checked for their unique holdings. The first year of work will entail compilation of the bibliography from these sources within state and through bibliographic databases and older printed catalogs nationally. The result will be an evaluated list of the most valuable titles for preservation, which will be accomplished by filming in the second year of work. The project will utilize a four-person scholarly review panel to rank titles according to their priority for research. A universe of approximately 5,000 volumes is estimated.

Project Budget

Estimated universe of relevant volumes 5,000

Number of serial volumes to be preserved 1,000

Number of monographic volumes to be preserved 500

Total number of volumes to be preserved 1,500

Estimated number of titles to be preserved 550

 

Sponsored cost

Cost sharing

Total cost

Identification & selection

   

Salaries & fringe benefits

$9,450

$15,876

$25,326

Search costs

900

 

900

Honoraria (4 @ $450)

1,800

 

1,800

Travel

2,500

 

1,500

Total direct identification costs $14,650

$15,876

$30,526

Filming

Per vol. x 1,500 vols.

Per vol. x 1,500 vols.

Per vol. x 1,500 vols.

Pre- and post- filming

$11.06

$16,590

$4.54

$6,804

$15.60

$23,394

Microfilming

47.92

71,875

   

47.92

71,875

Local bibliographic

control & records

2.00

3,000

8.74

13,104

10.74

16,104

Local quality inspection

2.04

3,060

   

2.04

3,060

Total direct filming cost

$63.02

$94,525

$13.28

$19,908

$76.30

$114,433

Total direct cost

 

$109,175

 

$35,784

 

$144,959

Indirect cost foregone (31%)

   

33,844

 

33,844

Total cost

     

$69,628

 

$178,803

 

 

5.7 NORTH CAROLINA AND NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY

Throughout this decade, the North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries has developed preservation programs that benefit not only its own collections, but also the preservation efforts of the state and the nation. In 1995, the Libraries established its Preservation Program as a separate administrative unit. Since it was formally constituted, the program has met or exceeded nearly all of the applicable preservation benchmarks established by the Association of Research Libraries. Currently, the program contains three administrative units: collection repair, commercial binding preparation, and shelf preparation. The program also provides preservation photocopying and rehousing. Recently, the program staff initiated a project with NCSU's Department of Wood and Paper Science to develop selection guidelines for using the Bookkeeper® mass deacidification process by assessing its effects on early- and mid-twentieth century books.

The NCSU Libraries' efforts to encourage statewide preservation projects predate its own formal preservation program. In 1989, the Libraries helped found the North Carolina Preservation Consortium, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to developing preservation programs for the state's libraries, historical societies, and document repositories. The consortium has developed a reputation throughout the state for delivering quality preservation training, and serves as a model for statewide preservation efforts. The Libraries has remained a strong participant in the NCPC and serves actively on its board of directors. The Libraries' preservation librarian also serves as the state's representative and information resource for SOLINET's disaster and response efforts.

In national preservation efforts, the Libraries has participated in both phases of SOLINET's Cooperative Preservation Microfilming Project 4 (CPMP4). That project, which preserved some one thousand titles from the Libraries' entomology collection, was notable for its use of color microfilm. Although color microfilm is unusual as a preservation medium, we believed that the plates should be filmed in color to preserve the information necessary for use by entomologists and historians of science. The Libraries has also recently submitted a proposal to participate in SOLINET's CPMP5. Our proposal, developed to complement our USAIN project, will preserve the periodical literature documenting the South's industrialization following the Civil War.

The Libraries is also a founding member of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN), a consortium of the four major university libraries in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area. Through TRLN, the Libraries has advocated and developed a consortium-wide disaster response plan that includes a formal agreement to assist participating libraries, a common disaster response document, and joint training exercises. This program will heighten the region's ability to respond to library emergencies.

North Carolina USAIN Project Staff

Winston Atkins, Preservation Librarian and head of the NCSU Libraries' Preservation Program, will supervise and coordinate the project to compile and prioritize the bibliography. Atkins developed the NCSU Libraries' proposal to preserve their historical entomological monographs for both phases of SOLINET's CPMP4 microfilming project, as well as the current proposal to microfilm the periodical literature that grew out of post-Civil War southern industrialization. While at Yale University, he also had direct experience in developing two NEH-funded preservation microfilming projects, serving as co-director for one.

North Carolina Scholarly Review Panel

Peter A. Coclanis has a Ph.D. in American History from Columbia University. He is the George and Alice Welsh Professor in the Department of History of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and serves as the department's chairperson. He has also served the Agricultural History Society in many roles, including president (1997/98), executive board member (current), and member of the editorial board for Agricultural History, the society's journal. He has written extensively on the history of southern agriculture, including The Shadow of a Dream: Economic Life and Death in the South Carolina Low Country, 1670-1920 (1989), which was awarded the Allan Nevins Prize by the Society of American Historians. His recent fellowships include The National Humanities Center Fellowship (1996/97); The Dickinson Fellowship in Economic and Business History (1997/98); and a Visiting Fellowship from the Institute of Asian Studies, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (Summer 1997).

Lu Ann Jones is an assistant professor in East Carolina University's Department of History, where she teaches North Carolina history and oral history methodology. Her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, is in American History. She also served as the director for "An Oral History of Southern Agriculture," for the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History (1986-1991). She has been the co-contributing Editor for Oral History for the Journal of American History and is an elected member of the Council of the Oral History Association. Her publications include co-authorship of Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (1987), which won the American Historical Association's Albert J. Beveridge Award and the Organization of American Historians' Merle Curti Award.

Anne R. Phillips is a visiting assistant professor in NCSU's Department of History. Her Ph.D. in American Studies is from the University of Maryland, College Park. She did a postdoctoral fellowship from Baylor University's Institute for Oral History. She served concurrently as the oral historian and project director of the Family Life and Community History Project, covering Washington County and Falls County, Texas. She has been invited to present papers at the Oral History Association (1991 and 1996), The National Women's Studies Association (1990), the Southern Association of Women Historians (1988) and the Southeastern Women's Studies Association (1988). She received a research fellowship from the University of Maryland and a North Carolina Humanities Council grant. Her areas of research include North Carolina agricultural history, including the role of women in the farm economy.

North Carolina Plan of Work and Project Budget

While the bibliography will draw primarily from the collections at North Carolina State University, Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the collections of the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, it is especially important that other, less traditional, views are represented. Therefore, we anticipate working with collections throughout the state. The sixteen-campus University of North Carolina system includes several universities that historically have served the state’s African Americans; their collections should give additional insight into the rural and agricultural life of the state. By working with the universities that served initially as women's colleges, we hope to document elements such as the home economics movement and the state's efforts in rural education.

We estimate that the bibliography will develop a collection of some 2,800 titles, including monographs and serials. Only the NCSU Libraries' collection has been totally converted to an online catalog.

Project Budget

Sponsor costs

Cost

Share

Total

Salaries and Fringe Benefits

$27,266

$4,298

$31,564

Honoraria (3 @ $450 per person)

1,350

1,350

Travel

1,640

1,640

Total Direct Costs

$30,256

$4,298

$34,554

Indirect Cost Foregone @ 47%

14,220

14,220

Total

$18,518

$48,774

 

 

5.8. North Dakota and North Dakota State University

North Dakota has a long history of successful participation in archival and bibliographic projects. The state has completed the NEH-sponsored project to microfilm our local newspapers; the State Library has microfiched state documents from statehood to the present; and the North Dakota State University Libraries has successfully completed its part of the national project to microfilm Experiment Station publications prior to 1975. Other important archival and bibliographic endeavors of the Libraries include indexing the Fargo Forum newspaper from its early days through the present, and scanning and placing the historical photograph collection "Northern Great Plains 1880-1920" on the Library of Congress’ American Memory web site.

For the USAIN State and Local Literature preservation project, the NDSU Libraries anticipates partnering with and obtaining additional assistance from the State Historical Society of North Dakota, the North Dakota State Library, and the University of North Dakota. Additionally, other libraries throughout the state may have holdings of interest to the project; working relationships among libraries across the state are excellent, and we expect the project to be well supported.

North Dakota USAIN Project Staff

This preservation project will be co-managed by Kathie Richardson and John Bye. Ms. Richardson has been a librarian at NDSU since 1986, serving in various capacities, primarily in bibliographic and reference areas. She is currently the Agricultural Sciences Librarian. Prior to coming to NDSU she was a serials librarian and serials cataloger at Iowa State University Library, and also served as head of the Technical Services division at the St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota. She will be assisted by John Bye, the NDSU University Archivist. Mr. Bye administers the Institute for Regional Studies collections and the NDSU Archives and serves on the North Dakota State Historical Records Advisory Board. He has been on the staff of the NDSU Libraries since 1973, serving as serials cataloger and serials department head prior to becoming archivist. He has published guides to North Dakota manuscript collections, and was primarily responsible for organizing and mounting the Northern Great Plains web site on the Library of Congress American Memory site.

They will work together to coordinate the activities of the project participants and the scholarly review panel, and to supervise the development of the bibliography and the retrieval and preparation of materials for filming. Ms. Richardson will assume primary responsibility for compiling the bibliography, with assistance from a library associate. The cataloging of filmed titles will be performed by our professional cataloger, a position which is currently open. Assistance will also be provided by other librarians on the staff of the NDSU Libraries, especially the Humanities Librarian, the Social Sciences Librarian, and the Germans from Russia Librarian, as well as the Interlibrary Loan staff.

North Dakota Scholarly Review Panel

Dr. David Danbom received his Ph.D. in 1974 from Stanford University, and has been a Professor of History at NDSU since 1974. In addition to teaching American history, he has written numerous books, including Our Purpose is to Serve: The First Century of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and Born in the Country: A History of Rural America (nominated for the Theodore Saloutos Prize). Dr. Danbom has also published many research articles in such journals as The Historian, Agricultural History, Agriculture and Human Values, and North Dakota History. He has contributed numerous chapters to scholarly books and encyclopedias, and has won many state and regional awards as a teacher and researcher. He is currently working on a history of the Great Depression in Fargo.

Dr. Barbara Handy-Marchello received her Ph.D. in history from the University of Iowa in 1996 and is currently on the history faculty of the University of North Dakota, where she was just named chairperson of the History Department. Her areas of interest include women's studies, western history, and the Great Plains. Her dissertation was Carrying Half: Gender and Settlement in Rural North Dakota 1875-1930. In addition, she wrote an introduction for the re-publication of Grass of the Earth: Immigrant Life in the Dakota Country, by Aagot Raaen. Two of her articles have also appeared in North Dakota History, including "The Main Story: Women's Productive Work on Pioneer Farm," and "Land, Liquor, and the Women of Hatton, North Dakota." The latter article was honored by being included in The Centennial Anthology of North Dakota History.

Dr. Gary Goreham received his Ph.D. in sociology in 1985 from South Dakota State University. He has been on the Department of Sociology faculty at NDSU since 1985, and has just become chairperson. His teaching responsibilities include courses in community development, social science research methods, and sociology of the family; his research focuses on rural sociology and the rural history of North Dakota. Dr. Goreham has published numerous articles in Rural Sociology, Great Plains Sociologist, and North Dakota Farm Research Bimonthly Bulletin. He has also authored books and reports. He is editor of the recent landmark publication Encyclopedia of Rural America: the Land and People. He was awarded the Great Plains Society Outstanding Service award in 1994, and is an active member of that organization as well as the Rural Sociological Society, the Rural Church Network of the US, and the Community Development Society.

Dr. H. Roald Lund received his Master’s degree from NDSU in 1958, and joined the faculty of the Department of Agronomy as a wheat and oat breeder the same year. He received his Ph.D. in agronomy from Purdue University in 1965, then returned to the NDSU faculty to continue his research, and also to teach plant science and genetics. He became Assistant Dean of Agriculture and Assistant Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station in 1969, and in 1979 the Dean and Director, a position he held until 1994, when he returned to active teaching and research. During his career Dr. Lund served on numerous national, regional and state agricultural boards and committees: the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, the North Central Regional Association of Experiment Station Directors, the National Agricultural Research Planning Committee (where he served as lead administrative advisor to the Current Research Information System (CRIS), and the North Dakota State Seed Commission, to name just a few.

North Dakota Plan of Work and Project Budget

North Dakota State University Libraries will undertake the project, with the cooperation of other libraries in the state, especially the State Historical Society of North Dakota, State Archives and Historical Research Library, North Dakota State Library, and University of North Dakota Library. The bibliographic project will be accomplished in a year. An extensive bibliography of all North Dakota publications of relevance to agriculture or rural life (excluding newspapers, manuscripts and federal documents) will be compiled. We anticipate identifying about 1,200 monographic and serial titles representing approximately 2,000 volumes. A panel of four scholars including historians, rural sociologists, and agriculture specialists will review the bibliography and rank the titles according to priority for preservation according to the model established by the National Preservation Program guidelines. The top-ranked 25% to 30% of the volumes which have not already been preserved by archival quality filming will be microfilmed. Filming will be contracted to a firm with experience and expertise in archival quality filming. We anticipate microfilming approximately 700 volumes. The microfilm will be cataloged in MARC format and the bibliographic records entered into OCLC. The master copy of the microfilm will be deposited with the National Agricultural Library. An additional master copy will be housed at either the State Historical Society of North Dakota or the NDSU Libraries, with a publicly available service copy at the NDSU Libraries.

Project Budget

Estimated universe of relevant volumes 2,000

Number of serial volumes to be preserved 350

Number of monographic volumes to be preserved 350

Estimated total number of volumes to be preserved 700

Number of titles to be preserved 400

 

Sponsored cost

Cost sharing

Total cost

Identification & selection

   

Salaries & fringe benefits

$2,880

$5,760

$8,640

Search costs

3,180

 

3,180

Honoraria (4 @ $400)

1,600

 

1,600

Travel

4,000

 

4,000

Total direct identification cost $11,660

$5,760

$17,420

       
       

Filming

Per vol. x 700 vols.

Per vol. x 700 vols.

Per vol. x 700 vols.

Pre- and post- filming

$ 6.44

$4,509

   

$6.44

$4,509

Microfilming

54.74

38,318

   

54.74

38,318

Local bibliographic

control & records

1.43

1,000

$24.41

$17,089

25.84

18,089

Local quality inspection

1.45

1,012

   

1.45

1,012

Total direct filming cost

$64.06

$44,839

$24.41

$17,089

$88.47

$61,928

             

Total direct cost

 

$56,499

 

$22,849

 

$79,348

Indirect cost foregone (47%)

   

26,555

 

26,555

Total cost

     

$49,404

 

$105,903

 

 


 
 
 
 
Grant Proposal, PHASE III
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